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A PHOENIX from the ashes as a CULT location

Originally opened as a spa facility, the Sofienbad was Europe’s first pool. Over the years the pool was expanded into an event venue and the Sofienbad became the Sofiensäle, later establishing itself as the largest and most popular event venue in Vienna. Johann Strauss father and son played and conducted the legendary “Schrammelquartett” here. Furthermore, the Sofiensäle served as the centre for music recordings of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by Herbert von Karajan.

In 2001 a devastating fire destroyed the legendary, heritage-protected Sofiensäle. The rooms were completely burnt out, the roof construction fell in and only the facade and some parts of the walls remained standing.

The Sofiensäle languished in ruins for a whole decade before we acquired it.

The challenge of this revitalisation – the only one of its kind in Austria – was combining the historic substance of the Sofiensäle with modern, contemporary architecture.

The Grand Hall which had once been so frequented and was then completely destroyed has now been restored to its original state under the most stringent specifications of the Federal Heritage Office and has been returned to its former glory. In addition, the building was expanded to include privately financed and subsidised apartments, the lean luxury Ruby Hotel and a modern fitness centre.

Facts

Location
Austria, 1030 Vienna, Marxergasse
Purpose
Apartments, offices, restaurant, "Lean Luxury" Hotel Ruby Sofie, John Harris fitness centre
Usable space
12,000 m²
Architecture
Albert Wimmer ZT GmbH, Söhne & Partner Architekten ZT GmbH
Status
sold
Project volume
EUR 52 million
Completion
2013